Get Lit Workshop recap

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Saturday we had 19 awesome students join us for the first "Get Lit" workshop at ASA Photographic in Billerica. We kicked off the morning session with 2-hours of demos and slides before breaking for lunch and the afternoon's hands-on part of the day.

The above photo is Kenley, an awesome, last minute addition who kicked some serious butt (thanks a million dude).

Also, special thanks to Mike and Tony who shot some great video during the afternoon, and which I'll be able to share in the next few weeks, and to the always amazing Jess for modeling for us.

Some of the behind the scenes photos, shot by both George and myself.

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Carolyn lends a hand while I demo the effects of hard vs. soft light.

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Brian's assignment was to shoot a college athlete, working alone with only hard lights - he had to create both portrait and landscape photos with only 6 minutes of shooting time.

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Krista (with monopod) assists Meg during our simulated wedding assignment.

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Carolyn rocked the Ezy-box for her assignment.

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And the photo that resulted.

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The full class, photo by Mike.

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For more, check out Matt's review, as well as his sweet photo of "The Congressman". And this post wouldn't be complete without a thank you to Connecticut photographer Seshu who made the drive to join us for the day.

One light in a hallway in Lowell

I spent the afternoon today hanging out with Rich, Ash and Anne up in Lowell. Rich, Ash, Mark and I have some fun plans coming up with the Help Portrait project, so stay tuned for that, and it was great to see Anne's new studio space and play with her Profoto setup. We took the light outside for a bit, but when the battery conked out on us, we headed back to the safety of ye ole' wall plug.

Rich in the parking lot:

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One light in the hallway (setup shot at the end):

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The light was pretty much the same for all of these, a 30" Profoto Octa.

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As always, more TK shortly.

Behind the Scenes: Element Hotel: Lexington

I got a call late last week from the PR group that represents the Element Hotel chain (they're a Starwood property). The Element in Lexington is starting a new program where each room will be equiped with a Nintendo DS loaded with recipe software. The program will then talk you through various meals you can cook in your room with ingredients available at the hotel - pretty cool (and much better than another dinner at Applebees).

I shot a little less than a hundred images, delivering 2, the background of one of which I wanted to share here.

One of the shots the client requested was an image with the Nintendo in the foreground and the hotel logo in the background. Pretty straight forward, right? Well, sorta.

Things started Here's the lobby lit by ambient light. Note the pukey green fluorscent light above the logo.

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Clearly that's not going to work. The first step was to ask the hotel manager to turn off the light. "Um, sorry, there's no switch for that light." Great. As I was trying to figure out how many images I was going to have to blend to tame the exposure variation, the hotel manager just unscrewed the lighbulb. Um. Duh. Simple. Easy.

Here's the room ambient with the green tube light turned off.

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ZZZ. Boring

Solution? Let's start with a diagram and a behind the scenes shot.

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Notice how the flash that's lighting the logo isn't even pointing directly at it. With the opposite white wall, the feathering of the light (meaning, not pointing the light directly at the logo), and the bounce off of the white wall serve to light the logo evenly. I then lit the Gameboy separately with a little pop from an SB-600 zoomed to 85mm. (Why 85mm? To control the spill. I didn't want to light the counter or background, just the foreground element).

And here's the final image (I dropped the screen shot in later in Photoshop).

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The other image from the shoot.

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More to come, I've busy week ahead, including my first destination wedding. (Helllllo St. Louis!)