Microsoft proposes a new colorspace

A new colorspace, you might say, what do you mean? Well it seems the big Windows giant has developed what it is calling scRGB - a new colorspace designed, as they claim, to, "add depth and richness to photos."

The problem with this idea, is that it appears the scRGB space is still not as expansive as the Adobe RGB (1998) colorpspace, or the ProPhoto colorspace. At the moment, the sRGB space is basically color as optimized for the Internet. However, if you want to achieve the broadest arrange of color possible, you shoot, edit and (hopefully, but it's sometimes difficult to do), print in Adobe or ProPhoto.

So will this "new" space help? Sure, it may make your Internet display better, and it should help point & shooters, but I doubt - and the article acknowledges - that it will affect the high-end market.

The Microsoft story here. More information on what Adobe RGB is here, and ProPhoto here.

Random Inspiration


Saturday, before I went to Josh's for our DIY ringlight day, I was putting my camera bag in my trunk and saw the leaf pictured just sitting there, begging to be photographed. So I threw my 50 F/1.8 on my D200 and with some 1/2 CTO gel on my flash, fired off a few shots before getting in the car. I guess you never know when a cool photo will pop up. (Basically what I'm saying is, thank god I waxed my car a few weeks ago so the water would bead all cool like that).

New Ringflash






Well, yesterday Josh and I decided that we were going to be do-it-yourself kings and build the ringlight described here . Well, it wasn't that easy, and it took us about 7 hours and two trips to Home Depot to get it right. We ended up using a 9 in drain with a 3 inch pipe for the lens on the inside. We're still having some mounting problems with the bracket, so I'm shooting with it handheld at the moment, as to make the L brackets work, we'll have to enlarge the hole at the bottom for my flash some first. That's Josh hard at work with the Dremel in the photos. It's definitely a tool-intensive task, and would be near impossible without at least a Dremel and jigsaw.

Note the removed square sides from the drain that we picked up at Home Depot. The final product is covered with translucent paper from Staples, but we talked about getting some plastic-type covering that would hold up to wear and tear better. As it is, I can see myself replacing the paper every few months.

What else, the inside is lined with aluminum tape to maximize the light output, and the paper is attached (at the moment) with glue from a glue-stick, of the kind you would find in any third-grade class.

E-mail me with any more questions, I'd post my actual receipt if I could find it, but the total was around $40 for each of us.

Check out Josh here.